Growth Mindset VS. Fixed Mindset
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Ashley Spires’ book “The Most Magnificent Thing”, inspired this 6 Part series looking at the power of “Growth Mindset” in Early years education and beyond each part has been “paired” with an online video reference to extend the conversation

– by Nikos Kritsantonis, Origins Education

Mathematician John Mason from the University of Oxford claims that all students have “natural powers” in problem solving. He claims that these powers are integral to human intelligence and are used across fields of human activity. When it comes to being a successful problem solver, it is really about learning to use these powers within the right context. Cognitive psychologist Lev Vygotsky used the example of mathematics to argue that learning is a scientific endeavour and that students need to be in the presence of a teacher, who will scaffold the process of learning. It is within that process that students make meaning and they eventually become aware of how fundamental  is to human intelligence to follow that process.

Another influential educator and mathematician Jo Boaler, in her book “The elephant in the classroom” claims that ” one of the most damaging mathematics myths propagated in classrooms and homes is that maths is a gift, that some people are naturally good at maths and some are not” It is not only academics and mathematicians who are making the point that success is something you learn. Writers and artists as well are argue that what most people refer to as talent is the result of perseverance, resilience, self-awareness and systematic work, qualities that are at the core of 21st Century learning skills.

So, if we all have the power to be creative what’s getting in our way? Here lays the importance of  Early years education. It is at this developmental stage that kids shape their mindset and it is really important/vital? to make positive assumptions /connections about their abilities and (build) trust on themselves/self-trust?

Developing a Growth Mindset